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Staph infection at a vaccination site resulting in cellulitis.

Photo Credit: CDC/ Allen W.Mathies, MD, (Calif/EPO), Immunization Branch Hundreds of people are searching the internet daily with questions like what does MRSA look like on a person or what does MRSA look like on human skin?

Below you'll see a complete selection of MRSA pictures (and Staph infection pictures) that will help you know what visible signs to look for.It's important to know that MRSA is a type of Staph bacteria, therefore pictures of Staph and MRSA photos can look identical.What Does MRSA Look Like?Looking at pictures of MRSA infection and pictures of Staph infection on skin can help you answer the question what does MRSA look like, but only a laboratory test can show whether you actually have MRSA or not.

So use the following MRSA photos and pictures of Staph infections as a helpful guide - not as a substitute for a bacterial culture or DNA test from your doctor to confirm what is causing your infection.MRSA Staph Skin Infections: Boils, Blisters and Abscesses and More...Staph infection and MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are commonly visible as skin boils, blisters or pus-filled bumps.

Swelling and reddening are common, and larger abscesses under the skin may form.In some cases, deeper more serious soft tissue infections such as cellulitis can occur.Cellulitis, boils and abscesses are more common with community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) than health-care associated MRSA (HA-MRSA).

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